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  • Writer's pictureDrew Schettler

Confronting Your BIGGEST Filmmaking Insecurity



If you’re anything like me, you doubt yourself, you question, whether or not you’re good enough as a filmmaker. Everywhere you look there’s always someone better than you, they have more connections, more followers, and they never run out of work, and then on top of that if you got to the point where you created something you begin to ask yourself who would watch it, why would they watch it, and then end up not posting it all. And it seems like this perpetual cycle of self doubt and comparison leaves us with a need to correct our perspective of who we are and how we create.


So let me give you a few ways you can help overcome these doubts and stay motivated as a filmmaker.



Confronting Your BIGGEST Filmmaking Insecurity

First, stop comparing and start celebrating.


This is probably the most important point because we have this endless infatuation with comparing our skills with others and it only leads to a competitive anti team spirit, the only problem is that leads to more anxiety and more stress. The remedy to comparison is celebrating others successes. We have to put aside our ego, and tuck that competitive spirit of me vs you away and instead start uplifting other creators. Like their content, comment on their posts. Send an encouraging text. Don’t do it expecting anything in return. Just pure transaction less genuine encouragement. If you switch your mindset to think of it this way, there is so much demand in the market that there is no room for competition only support.


Stop comparing and start celebrating the wins of other people.

Which leads me to my next point...



Make friends in the filmmaking industry.


Not so you can get something out of them one day or one day they can get you a job, but you need to build a genuine core group of friends maybe 3-5 people that are pushing you to be a better artist and are willing to give honest constructive feedback of your work. You need friends that will help grow you because if it’s just you, Your mind will end up being an echo chamber of self criticism. But close Friends have a way of opening your perspective while also lending moral support. Everyone experiences low moments when creating something inspiring, and you need friends that are going to reinforce that initial spark of energy to keep the project moving forward. So today I challenge you to find that core group of friends that are going to make you better.


Everyone experiences low moments when creating something inspiring, and you need friends that are going to reinforce that initial spark of energy to keep the project moving forward.

So now that we’re developing a strategy to combat self doubt we have to...



Embrace Failure and grow constantly.


Failure is a part of growth. Learning through experience is invaluable. Personally, I’ve created seven short films, and while none of them felt like a breakthrough moment of my career, I can look back and see the progress from each one. And each one of them I remember thinking “what am I doing” I’m way in over my head. I was a fool to think I could actually be good at this. But I persisted and learned. Through things that didn’t work so that I could refine the skill. And of course I’m still learning, but I think that’s the point. Don’t run from risky opportunities that may cause you to fail.


Embrace the failures, embrace the learning moment, grow from it and move forward.


And that leads me to my next point...



Don’t take yourself too seriously.


Just be a genuine authentic person who is kind, helpful, and willing to take feedback. There’s a difference between nerding out about filmmaking gear and and on the other hand telling everyone what they don’t know about the industry. Don’t be that second guy. Leave your pretentious attitude at the door and be a team player. Don’t try to one up everyone and tell everyone what you know. Instead be collaborative and supportive to the overall vision in every creative project.


Leave your pretentious attitude at the door and be a team player.


Create a process that keeps you inspired.


Lastly, I believe creating any work of art is a sort of spiritual endeavor that takes every part of your existence to bring a concept to reality. So it’s crucial to create a process that keeps you inspired. Inspiration is sort of an elusive experience. It’s hard to really nail down, you can’t schedule it or command its presence, but you can prepare for it by remaining curious to life. I’ve always felt that if you stay curious you’ll stay inspired.


Practically, in order to do this I suggest immersing yourself in books, films, conversations with friends, life experiences that keep the spark alive. And make sure you record some of your ideas. Have a notebook or a note on your phone that keeps a running total of creative ideas.

I hope some of these ideas will keep you motivated as a filmmaker and help when Confronting Your BIGGEST Filmmaking Insecurity.


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